Superstitions/Traditions

Find example ceremonies and traditions to help write your vows.

Something Borrowed, Something Blue

“Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, and a Sixpence in your Shoe”. This rhyme originated during Victorian times and is still commonly practiced for good luck. Something Old ~ The “old”signifies the hope that the couple’s friends will stay with them. ~ The “old” also symbolizes the bride’s connection to her past –…

Set the Date:When should you get married?

Congratulations! If you’re reading this it’s probably because you’ve recently gotten engaged and now the next decision, what day is best to get Married. There are a lot of things to consider when choosing your day.  Is there a time of year your family gets together regularly, are there dates or seasons your family will…

Unity Candle (Multiple Traditions)

This joining ritual is quite popular tradition at Catholic weddings, but its significance is universal: the joining of the couple as a new family, as well as the merging of their two original families. Usually the officiant will explain the unity candle’s meaning – the following is an example: _____ and _____, the two separate…

Triple Ring Exchange (Eastern Orthodox Tradition)

Triple Ring Exchange (Eastern Orthodox Tradition) The wedding rings are blessed during the betrothal ceremony.  After reciting blessings and biblical passages, the priest makes the sign of the cross while holding the rings and declaring the betrothal. He may hold the rings in his hands while pressing the foreheads of the couple three times each. …

Test the four Elements (Yoruba tradition)

Test the four Elements (Yoruba tradition) In a ritual adapted from a Yoruba tradition, the bride and groom taste four flavors that represent different emotions within a relationship: sour (lemon), bitter (vinegar), hot (cayenne), and sweet (honey). By tasting each of the flavors, the couple symbolically demonstrates that they will be able to get through…

Seven Steps (Hindu tradition)

Seven Steps (Hindu tradition) After the couples has taken seven steps around the fire at their ceremony, their bond is sealed, and the following is recited in a ritual, Saptha Padhi. It also makes a beautiful reading on its own. We have taken the seven steps. You have become mine forever. Yes, we have become…

Non-Denominational Sand Ceremony

Here a a collection of sand ceremonies.  Similar to a unity candle, the sand ceremony represents the joining of two lives into one.  This ceremony is especially well suited for summer weddings, lake weddings, and beach weddings. 1.       As the minister says the following wording, the couple alternately pours sand into the glass vessel to…

Rose Ceremony (Non-Denominational)

Rose Ceremony

Non-Denominational Rose Ceremony This modern ritual incorporates one of the most beloved symbols of romantic love – the rose. A white one is used in honor of the wedding day. GROOM (handing bride the rose): ______________, take his rose as a symbol of my love. It began as a tiny bud and blossomed, just as…

P’ye-Baek (Korean Tradition)

A P’ye-Baek (Korean Tradition) The bride offers dates and chestnuts – symbols of children – to the groom’s parents while sitting at a low table covered with other symbolic offerings. The parents offer sake in return, and as a final gesture they throw the dates and chestnuts at the bride, who tries to catch them…