Superstitions/Traditions

Find example ceremonies and traditions to help write your vows.

Meher (Muslim Tradition)

Included in the marriage contract is a meher, a formal statement specifying the monetary amount the groom will present to the bride. It is traditionally considered the bride’s security and guarantee of freedom within the marriage. There are two parts to the meher: a “prompt” due before the marriage is consummated, and a deferred amount,…

Mala Badol (Bandladesh Tradition)

After the wedding feast, the ritual of Mala badol is performed in Bangladesh and other South Asian countries. A thin cloth is placed over both the bride and groom. They feed each other and share sips of borhani (a spicy yogurt drink) beneath the cloth. While looking at their reflection in a mirror, the bride…

Libation Ceremony (African Tradition)

Libation is a traditional African ceremony in which water is poured on the ground in the four directions that the wind comes from in remembrance and honor of the couple’s ancestors, calling on them to be present to witness the marriage. Often a family elder does the honors, and guests respond o the blessing with…

Lazo (Latino tradition)

In Guatemala, the couple bind themselves together during the ceremony with a silver rope. Mexican couples perform a similar ritual, where a rosary or white rope is round their shoulders in a figure eight to symbolize their union. While the couple is bound together, the priest may recite the following: “Let’s the union of binding…

Kola nuts (Nigerian Tradition)

Another gift giving tradition, this one originates in Nigeria In Africa, kola nuts represent healing; giving them to each other (often after the vows) is a symbol of the couple’s commitment to work out their differences and support each other through hard times.

Jumping the Broom (African-American Tradition)

An African tribal ritual had couples placing sticks on the ground to symbolize their home together. This may be the origin of the broom jumping tradition, which was popular among among African-American slaves (who could not have official wedding ceremonies); it may also symbolize the sweeping away of evil spirits. The couple holds the broom…

Honey Ceremony (Multifaith tradition)

Honey is a symbol of the sweetness in life. And so, with this dish of honey, we proclaim this day as a day of great joy and celebration – a day to remember – Your Day. We thank you, Allah [or substitute deity name], for creating this divine substance, and ask you to bless it,…

Honey and Walnuts (Greece)

In some of the Greek islands, the wedding ceremony ends with honey and walnuts offered to the bride and groom from silver spoons. Walnuts are chosen because they break into four parts, symbolizing the bride the groom, and their two families.

Homage o the Fire God, Agni (Hindu tradition)

The following is recited over a ceremonial fire: “O Lord Fire, First Created Being! Be thou the over-lord and give food and drink to this household. O Lord Fire, who reigns in richness and vitality over all the worlds, come take your proper seat in his home! Accept the offering made here, protect the one…

Handfasting Traditions

Handfasting (Afrocenric) In some African tribes, the bride and groom have their wrists tied together with cloth or braided grass. To symbolize your own unity, have your officiant or a close friend tie your wrists together with a piece of kente cloth or a strand of cowrie shells (symbols of fertility and prosperity) while affirming…