Something Borrowed, Something Blue

“Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, and a Sixpence in your Shoe”.

This rhyme originated during Victorian times and is still commonly practiced for good luck.

Something Old
~ The “old”signifies the hope that the couple’s friends will stay with them.

~ The “old” also symbolizes the bride’s connection to her past – a sense of family, continuity and tradition.

~This would traditionally have been the garter of a happily married woman, with the thought being that her good fortune would be passed down along with it.

Something New
~ Optimism and Hope for the future.

Something Borrowed
~ This is usually a much valued item from the bride’s family or a close friend.

~ It also reminds the bride that family and friends will always be there for her.

~ By borrowing something from a happily married friend or family member it is a wish for your married life to mirror their happiness (So Choose Carefully!).

Remember! – The borrowed item must be returned to ensure good fortune(not to mention to keep from burning any bridges.).

Something Blue
~ Blue represents faithfulness, fidelity and constancy. It is also considered a lucky color in Ireland.

~ In early Biblical times, blue not white symbolized purity. Both the bride and groom usually wore a band of blue material around the bottom of their wedding attire, hence the wedding tradition of “something blue”.

A Sixpence in Your Shoe
~ A sixpence is a symbol of good luck. (Can Be Substituted With A Dime)

~ A silver sixpence in the bride’s shoe is to ensure wealth in the couple’s life as well as the promise of a lifetime of joy, health, happiness, and wedded bliss for the newlyweds.

~ In 17th century England, the sixpence was part of the bride’s dowry gift to the groom.

Often you can find a sixpence at local coin shops, for our wedding we went to Tulsa Coin and Stamp on Sheridan and the owner had a box of them behind the counter, he gave my wife on with her birth year at no charge for the wedding.

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